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20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
that technology was invented by somebody and it was invented by scientists that put together an idea and figured out how to make it work. >> that's true. we see innovation as the practical expression of imagination where you turn ideas into reality. and we're all about that here at the tech museum of innovation. >> what are some of the other exhibits? >> well, if you come to the tech museum you may want to get tickets to "mythbusters" an amazing exhibit. you can see the blueprints and if you get more wet whether you walk on run through the rain. you can play with react table where you move blocks around to may musical compositions and come down to our hands on on science workshop and build your own plane. >> that's one of the really neat things down here is not just sitting here in a class and learning about science but you get to do some real hands on stuff so you can understand how things work. >> it's true. you know, bay area science festival is all about unleashing your inyour scientists and tech museum. we want to help unleash your inner science. >> reporter: totally for geeks like me but i
much" series. watch on c-span2. >> now a conference from detroit focusing on technology and entrepreneurship in u.s. urban areas throughout the country. it was a conference in mid september at wayne state university. this part of the conference's two hours. >> i'm going to turn it over to you. >> rock on. >> thank you for getting us started and thank you for being here. it is exciting to finally have this thing under way. we have been working on it for an awfully long time. what we do is up to now, a retreat-like invitation only leaders thing in the desert and we really wanted to get our message out in the broader community, particularly in the united states where we think there are some messages that are not sufficiently understood. i hope that is what you will be hearing throughout the day today. the messages at this event are focused on four issues -- u.s. competitiveness, the future of jobs, economic growth, which is tied to the first to, and the revival of our cities with detroit as a case study #one. we're very proud to be in detroit because we see it as a great ci
in the world. we're blessed with terrific soldiers and extraordinary technology and intelligence. but the idea of a trillion dollars in cuts through sequestration and budget cuts to the military would change that. we need to have strong allies. our association and -- and connection with our allies is essential to america's strength. we're the -- the great nation that has allies, 42 allies and friends around the world. and finally, we have to stand by our principles. and if we're strong in each of those things, american influence will grow. but unfortunately, in nowhere in the world is america's influence greater today than it was four years ago. >> all right. >> and that's because we've become weaker on each of those four dimensions. >> all right -- perfect. you're going to get a chance to respond to that because that's a perfect segue into our next segment, and that is what is america's role in the world. and that is the question. what do each of you see as our role in the world? and i believe, governor romney, it's your turn to go first. >> well, i -- i absolutely believe that america has a
technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set-while supplies last. sale ends soon! you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. everyone in the nicu, all the nurses wanted to watch him when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment. i wouldn't trade him for the world. who matters most to you says the most about you. massmutual is owned by our policyholders so they matter most to us. if you're caring for a child with special needs, our innovative special care program offers strategies that can help. >> thanks for staying with us, i'm bill o'reilly. in the weekdays with bernie segment tonight. after the storm chaos subsides most likely on thursday
groups use of technology. he also echoed others about the voters themselves. >> they're very independent minded. they are hard-working, working class citizens that vote for the person. they think the person is the best-- the person that most exemplifies who they are and will do the best job for them. so i think what you see here in green bay is a microcosm of what you see all across this state, the people want a new direction. >> reporter: given recent shifts here, though, the question in wisconsin remains: which really is the new direction? one prominent local citizen isn't tipping his hand. we met green bay mayor jim schmitt at a.l.s. hamburger shop. i noticed you're not endorsing either candidate. why's that? >> no. you what... what? look, i'm the mayor. i know who i want to be mayor, but when it comes to... >> reporter: you feel good about that one! >> i feel pretty good about that endorsement. >> reporter: mayor schmitt may be the smartest politician around. with a constituency fiercely divided and independent, he directed us to his own house a few blocks away. there we found one si
is, how we take this to the next question? obama has a plan to do that with technology, research and development. host: we are speaking tim ryan, from the youngstown area of ohio. mike from houston, texas on our line for republicans. caller: good morning. i grew up in ohio. i have family there for 50 years. my concern here, congressman, class of 1983. my concern here congressman is that, i look at the democrats and i see a party that desires to command and control the economy. i see where, in houston, i've been here 20 years now new york houston we had an oil bust in 1985. the government didn't bail out houston but houston is home to 150,000 californians from the past 10 years alone. texas was not bailed out but now houston is host city to the world's largest medical center. it is growing faster than any large city in the united states. and no federal money. it is not a command and control economy. it has more free market and no state income tax and look at california as a case study they've lost 350,000 people to texas alone in the last 10 years. texas is growing, california is
, as you can see, trying to to come out and do some -- we use live view technology and sometimes coming out of some of those underground areas is very difficult here and i'm told richard is back so we'll go to him one more time. we did lose you for a moment. i was explaining technology. please continue. where all this water, this 2.5 million gallons of water and this is just one of many, the connection to brooklyn and that's where we lost you at brooklyn. >> reporter: yeah, it is one of seven that were flooded either fully or partially and, chuck, to given you a sense where we're at, the water here, i don't know if you can see it but at the top there is gasoline-type products floating at the top. you can kind of smell it down here. we're not going to spend too much time here. that's what they'll have to deal with as they pump out this water. in addition to the subway problems that are ahead for mta, and that's the transportation authority here, there's also the car tunnel. there are two of which are closed down right now. the brooklyn battery tunnel is the longest underwater tunnel in north
technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. this is your body there. you can see a little more pressure in the shoulders and in the hips. ... now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. at sleep number we've created a collection of innovations dedicated to individualizing your comfort. the sleep number collection, designed around the innovative sleep number bed - a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the exact comfort your body needs. each of your bodies. so whatever you feel like, sleep number's going to provide it for you. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set-but only while supplies last. sale ends soon! you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. a wiit takes some doing.n't just happen. some coordinating. and a trip to the one place with the new ideas that help us pull it all together.
that we see and how much of it is what is ta ted about it as structural issues, changing technology,ed globalization, a kind of new normal that we've heard about from many pple? >> well -- >> i think-- hold on, let me go withpustan goolsbee here first. >> okay. >> okay, so two parts of the how much of the unemployment rate is coming from structural, i think not that high. i do think that is the thing that the economy is going to have to do. the fundamental reason why this recession loo a lot a like the 2001 recovery and not the 1983 recovery is we can't go back to doing what we were doing before the recession began. just as in 2001 a bubble popped and then you're trying to shift what the economy is doing. so there is some element of that. but we also have b got a significant component as i saof the whole world has slowed down. the u.s. growth rate while not fast enough is faster than the rest of the advanced world. so we've got to find a way to get ourselves boosted up where we're not getting any support from being leng to increase our exports to other countries when that is exactly th
's really not about you. we have so much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. this is your body there. you can see a little more pressure in the shoulders and in the hips. ... now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. at sleep number we've created a collection of innovations dedicated to individualizing your comfort. the sleep number collection, designed around the innovative sleep number bed - a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the exact comfort your body needs. each of your bodies. so whatever you feel like, sleep number's going to provide it for you. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set-but only while supplies last. sale ends soon! you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. back to "hardball." >>> welcome back to "hardball." the fight for the u.s. senate can be as significan
impediment is not the technology anymore. i think it's the actual unfortunate lack of insurance coverage for many people who want to get this done but can't get it done. >> reporter: fortunately, daniela finally did get it done, thanks to a program through the the share institute which freezes eggs at no cost to the cancer patients. >> we've helped somewhere between 70 to 80 women so far. >> reporter: she now has 22 eggs to use when she is ready to start a family. >> it's really peace of mind that i might be able to have my own children some day. >> reporter: she's halfway through her chemo treatment and hopes more cancer patients have the same opportunity she did. cbs news, new york. >>> 14 minutes after 7:00 now, it looks like it's going to be a pretty nice weekend around the bay area. we have a warm up going on, brian. >> it looks like it's going to be beautiful in the bay area. maybe not so beautiful in detroit. we shall see. the giants, nevertheless, they can bundle up, right? >> they will have to. i hope they can man up in these colder temperatures. >> i have no doubt. they're pro
school into auto mechanic or green jobs such as installing solar technology, things like that. that should be an option, as well. i think that it is a fallacy that every citizen or every resident of california needs to have a college education. >> so i have a question, here from the room. governor brown vetoed both the trust act and the domestic worker's bill last week, how do you feel about those pieces of legislation which are critical to the immigrant community? >> i think that the problem that the governor articulated with the trust act is the one that i just articulated two questions ago, it excludes large categories of serious crimes from the purview, meaning that people from the members of the gangs and convicted as such as well as other serious victim naturals are under the purview of the trust act and not subject to deportation, i think that it is wrong and ignores the rights to the citizens. >> with regard to the domestic workers i am an attorney who helps workers, and enforce their rights on the federal and state law and i think that it is important that those right
improve her outcome. >> he kept reassuring me there are new technologies in place he yut rised that he would be able to make my result aesthetically pleasing and help regenerate some of the feeling in the chest area that was lost. >> that is where f?zy graphing comes in. it's been a huge change for us. >> we watched as he performed the procedure, surgeons placed implants under muscle tissue in the chest. they don't compensate for lost breast tissue. >> taking fat and injecting it under the skin renders it softer, more attractive. blood vessels grow into it. nerves grow through it. >> that fat is typically harvested from the stomach area, then pro us sesed into a syringe. >> this is 60. this is brilliant he says these injections help the graphs take hold and remain in place allowing surgeons to model the shapes.. >> i'm injecting deep into the muscle player. -- layer. >> when finished he said patients return to a shape nearly identical to their presurnlry form. >> what we're able to offer is !?b procedure. the breast can be replaced with a combination of implant and fat grafting that ha
for her with a little help from technology. so how did you find one for her? >> well, i went around, looked at different colors that she requested, and then i took pictures, i sent them to her, and she replied. >> the reactions i see from the students is excitement. they're ready for their night, they're so excited that their dress fits, and it's just so nice to see them happy and that they just can't wait for their night. >> operation prom isn't just about dresses. >> it's not just for girls. we have partnerships with some tuxedo companies that will help us give tuxedos to boys going to proms, as well. >> in addition to the outfits, there's also tons of accessories. how does someone apply for clothing, and how do they prove they need the help? >> well, the student does have to fill out an application, and they need to see their guidance counselor or social worker, who will approve them for the program. they do need to be in financial need, and they have to be passing all of their classes. >> started in new york, operation prom is expanding to states across the country. in addition,
could do and bringing new technologies to north dakota. when i served on the commission and attorney general, i went to minnesota and hard-fought for the coal industry. i heard a lignite leader award. i am as committed to north dakota's energy industry as anyone can become a and i did not know there could be a better advocate and someone who would stand and say have been there, i have this experience, i can get the job done, and i a understand what those challenges are. that is what i am hoping to do when i go to washington, d.c., represent this growing industry and include in it biofuels and wind which the republican party has been very hostile to production tax credits. using every form of energy to make it work in this country. >> obviously, there is a problem. keystone is not built. it is not built because the senate majority leader has not brought it up for a vote. our president has been a post it as well. our coal industry, one of the things that has stunned me is the epa came out with new regulations on coal plants, and it was so stringent you could not build a new coal plant
is you. [ male announcer ] are you ready for tomorrow's technology today? then switch to at&t u-verse tv. add the wireless receiver exclusively from at&t, and you're no longer tied to the tv outlet. move your tv wherever you want in your home...even outside. [ megan ] call now and switch to u-verse for just $29 a month for six months, with a total home dvr included, free for life. add hbo and cinemax and get the first three months free. plus you can bundle tv and u-verse high speed internet with speeds up to 24 megs. [ male announcer ] our total home dvr lets you record four shows at once... and play them back in any room. every channel is in 100-percent, crystal-clear digital picture and sound. and you can upgrade to get 170 hd channels -- that's more than cable. [ megan ] so call now and switch to u-verse for just $29 a month for six months, with a total home dvr included, free for life. add hbo and cinemax and get the first three months free. [ male announcer ] at&t u-verse. it's tv like you've never seen before. ♪ >> the world series shift to detroit. the giants hope to continue th
quipped with high technology accessories like nice vision, high-tech cameras and they even see heat. >> they can save people in the middle of the night. >> reporter: once considered an expensive toy is seriously considered as a cleaner, safer, and less expensive way to save lives. report from dublin, cbs 5. >>> why are schools always on the chopping block when it come to the state budget? next, answers from governor brown. >> and days away from the november election. what bay area volunteers at this phone bank are considering voters to do. >> and lightning in a bottle? that is how this world series has been described. more highlights in sports. we will be right back. now... californians will dee whether to approve a tax increase favored by governor brown. the governor has been travel . >>> election day is nine days away and californians will decide whether to approve a proposition. this weekend volunteers are working phone banks. receipt polls show only 46% show support for the measure. prop 30 would show income taxes on the measure and raise sale's tax by a quarter of a percent
students to the corporate world. teens through young adults who learn about finance, health, technology and careers can beat the odds like michael. >> when in their own mind they created and played out their future and only see that future in one way, then they have been robbed. >> michael founded life skills sick years ago after reflecting on his own success. he been hand picked by toyota's president to leap on to the fast track of management but didn't start out that way. he was child with an uncertain future. >> i remember being at home in richmond in fear of my safety when and how my mom was going to get over certain struggles she was having, abusive relationship and being behind my education. >> he credits his godparents for showing him he could create a better life. >> that was the beginning of an open door that a different michael e. park core emerge. >> michael graduated from college and eventually became an entrepreneur and now through his nonprofit he is sharing the 411 of his success with students like patrick who is now a life skills mentor and marketing employee. and 21-yea
of ideologues in the political realm. the need to realize investments in basic technology and research can lead to economic development. an optimistic. politically, we have a great care around -- a great groudn game. i have 13-14 obama offices in my district alone. we have a huge weekend ahead of us are getting out the vote. a very mobilized and energized based. bill clinton has been here several times, joe biden, the president, etc. we will get the job done in the next few days. host: we're talking with democratic congressman tim ryan from ohio. if you want to ask him about the race in ohio or budget committee questions, the numbers are on your screen. we still have the line open for ohio residents. 202-585-3883. a couple of comments on twitter about the jobs numbers. another comment from james. your thoughts on those comments stocks -- on those comments? guest: know what is going does say they are satisfied and we should just quit doing what we are doing. who is able to take us from where we work, a whole that was dug with some ideological policies, blow a hole in the budget deficit, and the
elegant prints and it was didn't in terms of slowing down with the camera. with 35-millimeter technology now, cannon t90, nikonf3, you can go from 3 frames to six frames a minute. this camera, you wind it like there and wind it back, you take one picture, then you have to wind it, wind it back again to take the second picture, therefore, you have to slow down and think about what you're photographing, as opposed to just starting to shoot and warm up, and then decide that you've got the certain picture or where the photographs are heading. >> for those who have never seen one of these cameras, i have it in my hand. you're talking you look down through that? >> you look down into the camera and most 35-millimeter cameras are held up to your eye and you look through them straight ahead abandon -- and with this camera, you look down into it. show it like that. >> so we put it this way. >> you're looking down into the camera. and -- >> you can't see much here. >> and there's a magnifying piece which comes up like this, which magnifies the strene you're looking at and you see through the lens,
store starting construction this month. officials say consumers can expect cutting edge technology along with clothing, footwear and accessories for men, women and children. you also get expert recommendations for specific training needs. the store is expected to open in february. gas prices are dropping, but the same prices would have been considered outrageous just a few years ago. our drivers attitude's changing? >> the value of the school -- of that fuel has been changing more than the weather lately and drivers are not too happy about it. >> i think it is outrageous. i don't think anyone is happy about the price of gas, but what are you going to do? >> the more we fill up, the more we get used to paying higher prices. what is the normal price? >> anywhere under $4 would be decent. >> maybe $3 or $2.50 would be nice. >> $2.50 would probably be normal. >> over the years, we have created a new normal, pay more at the pump. >> we have a constant rate calibration of what our expectations are. >> not that long ago, $1.35 a gallon seemed way too high. times and attitudes have changed. >> p
across the country. it involves technology, investment in technology. i believe it starts in grades k- 12. talk about jobs between -- for people in their 20s and 30s. if we do not try to be more advanced, we will not be competitive in the global market. >> the middle class here is facing the same problem the middle-class is facing everywhere in the country. our government has not been able to work together because of being controlled by major lobby groups that are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax return -- tax reform that makes sense that accumulates revenue and is equitably history. we need to make sure we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the waste and mismanagement and misallocation of resources we see throughout government as is evidenced in benghazi. we need to address that. we can address that by having more independents there to let the people know there is someone else available to take their place. >> let's move onto the next question right now. go ahead. really quick. >> i campaign all over the state. i meet with people every d
transactions to a different, a different entity, a different central clearing entity. well, the technology of that is not really well understood at all, and it's hard to have confidence in that. but moreover, it's not clear that without some kind of government sponsorship or government backing or access to liquidity a central clearing facility will have the confidence to avoid, essentially, what would be a run. and while dodd-frank actually provides for some support to central clearing entities -- which, by the way, seems to go mostly unnoticed by critics who say, you know, we've eliminated government support, we've eliminated taxpayer support, we've eliminated the possibility of too big to fail -- we do have a provision that permits intervention to help in a modest way financial, financial utilities like central clearing facilities. however, that's not universe -- universal. there's no provision made in europe to support either directly or indirectly any central clearing facility. so in my mind we've created a series of risks within the derivatives area that were nonexistent before we beg
and technology. but its position has been challenged and, in some ways, surpassed by apple, google and others in recent years. some question its ability to innovate. now, microsoft is facing a pivotal moment and a crucial test, as ray suarez reports. ( applause ) >> it really is an exciting, exciting day. >> suarez: like other c.e.o.s, microsoft's steve ballmer often tries to generate buzz with his product launches. but the company's big event in new york yesterday had a different vibe. the company's well-known operating system, now called windows 8, is getting its biggest makeover in nearly two decades for the first time, windows' design is built around touch- screen capabilities and utilizes "apps" similar to its competitors that microsoft calls "live tiles." the software went on sale today as part of a global launch in countries like japan and china. the company is aiming directly at the mobile device market. >> what we've done is actually re-imagined windows, and we've re-imagined essentially the whole p.c. industry. in addition to notebooks and desktops, we introduced the p.c. as tablet,
. but these cars and oil burning equipment. they should be made more efficient. you cannot use the technology that you are using 100 years ago. and have oral burning equipment -- lyders said one oil was $5 a gallon. -- like i said. host: what about nuclear power? some critics believe it is dangerous, others believe that could replace fossil fuels. caller: 13 of nuclear plants 50 miles from where i live at. -- there are two nuclear plants. coal is hazardous to your help. unless they come up with a way to burn it cleaner. it is just dirty. host: here is the new york times and nuclear power. excuse me, the wall street journal. reactors at three of the points remained at of service tuesday. a plant in new jersey lost grid electricity forcing it to rely on a backup generator. the reactor, the oldest still operating in the united states, already was shut down for refueling. they said 36 of the 43 sirens intended to alert a nearby communities at the plants were not working. that is what happened at the nuclear power plants because of this storm. early snow pummels west regina, story. the superstorm
and even up to 50% more than leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> one thing is for sure, both campaigns for president aren't ending on a high note by any means. candor media looked back at the last week of campaign ads, and the obama campaign commercials have been 85% negative. you think that sounds bad until you look at the what the romney campaign has done in the last week. the romney ads have been 99% negative. 99%. and most of the 1% of positive ads were some lingering ads in spanish. so all the english language stuff is utterly awful. we'll be right back. gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ stop! sto
a future. persistent technology here in western massachusetts, this is a real opportunity for the future. only if there is a well-educated work force. that starts and home school, on into community colleges, and on into universities. i want to say this is about priorities. that is how i see it. there will not be a single, magic bullet. what the priorities. students will have to pick up more of the costs of student loans. twice, senator brown voted to let students rates double. why? it would have forced to pay for it closing a loophole used by millionaires. it is called the newt gingrich loophole. what are your priorities? protecting loopholes for millionaires or college education? >> great question. the cost of education is out of sight. we need to have an educated student population. my youngest daughter graduated. i understand. one of the largest driving forces behind the high cost of education is administrative costs. professor war makes about $350 thousand to teach a course. she got a zero interest loan and gets perks. it is interesting. kids are forced to go out and borrow money at
this in the coming days. >> but you say that we still depend on 20th century technology to power 21st century economy. what does that mean. >> that's referring to the electrical grid. we saw what 8 million people who lost power. we have a system that isn't ready for this kind of a disaster. you have a grid that can go down easily. even smaller events like halloween's storm last year. we have a system that's like the internet, more flexible, more resilient you can get it back online faster. >> people can tweet but still couldn't use internet or cell phones. >> exactly. the signature moment of the storm people tweeting that they had lost power which shows that very clearly. >> what are the big lessons back to the cover story, a lesson from the storm that makes a difference in terms of the future? >> a few. climate change clearly is real. scientists will differ how much climate change affect as storm like this. this will become more and more common in the future we'll have stronger storms, we'll have these coastal flooding events which are disastrous with sandy. one thing we need to deal with. secondar
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)